Expedition Planning 101 – How Models Can Help Guide Deep-Sea Exploration

By Dr. Sam Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute In May 2018, a joint Marine Conservation Institute and Marine Applied Research and Exploration (MARE) expedition will probe the deep seafloor within the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. The sanctuary is home to an astonishing diversity of cold-water corals and sponges that build crucial habitat Read more about Expedition Planning 101 – How Models Can Help Guide Deep-Sea Exploration[…]

5 Reasons Seamounts Matter

By Matt Coomer, Communications Coordinator at Marine Conservation Institute Seamounts are underwater mountains that rise from the seabed. Because most of the world’s seafloor is a muddy plain, seamounts are special deep-sea features that support unique creatures. Seamounts can arise along mid-ocean ridges, as isolated landmarks, or as volcanoes in chains and clusters. Off California, Read more about 5 Reasons Seamounts Matter[…]

Offshore Drilling: So What Happens Now?

  By Pete Stauffer, Environmental Director at Surfrider Foundation This post was originally featured on the Surfrider Foundation Blog on April 18, 2018. A final decision on the Trump administration’s offshore drilling proposal is at least a year away. Here’s what you can do right now to defend your coastline from new oil rigs! Earlier this year, the Read more about Offshore Drilling: So What Happens Now?[…]

Florida Pulled From Offshore Drilling Plan, But What About the Rest of the U.S.?

By Pete Stauffer, Environmental Director at Surfrider Foundation This post was originally featured on the Surfrider Foundation Blog on January 10, 2018. The Surfrider Foundation is pleased that Secretary Zinke has recognized that Florida’s coasts are heavily reliant on tourism and that its communities, businesses, and state leaders are strongly opposed to offshore drilling. Hundreds of local communities and Read more about Florida Pulled From Offshore Drilling Plan, But What About the Rest of the U.S.?[…]

The Future of the Deep Sea: Undiscovered Wonders at Risk

By Kelly Martin, Communications Intern at Marine Conservation Institute  You’ve probably heard the saying that we know less about the deep ocean than we do about the surface of the moon. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, we have explored less than 5% of the ocean to date, so the saying is pretty Read more about The Future of the Deep Sea: Undiscovered Wonders at Risk[…]

Needle in a haystack: identifying vulnerable marine ecosystems in the deep sea

By Dr. Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute  Seamounts are underwater mountains rising thousands of feet from the bottom of the ocean. Due to their size and shape, seamounts exert a strong influence on local currents that results in nutrient enrichment and increased food supply. As a result, these massive features are often Read more about Needle in a haystack: identifying vulnerable marine ecosystems in the deep sea[…]

Why protect 600,000 square miles that most people will never see?

By Jenny Woodman (@JennyWoodman) Ensia featured this piece with its original photos and visuals on October 3, 2017: https://ensia.com/features/marine-reserves/ All images seen here have been added for this republication and are by NOAA.  Much of what lay beneath the ship was a mystery. The edge of the continental shelf plummets more than 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) somewhere Read more about Why protect 600,000 square miles that most people will never see?[…]

Whales, Seamounts, and Fisherfolk: How Conservation Efforts are Attempting to Tackle a Growing Threat to Marine Life

By Kaitlin Lebon Hidden beneath the waters off the California coast lies a treasure trove of marine biodiversity. Seamounts, or underwater mountains, are veritable hotspots for a wide variety of undersea critters who call deep-sea ecosystems home. These steep peaks often break up ocean currents, allowing for nutrients to be brought up from deeper waters,[1] Read more about Whales, Seamounts, and Fisherfolk: How Conservation Efforts are Attempting to Tackle a Growing Threat to Marine Life[…]

Getting to the bottom of the oceans’ tallest peaks

By Jordan Macke Coldwater corals at Rodriguez Seamount. Photo: MBARI. Our oceans are home to a number of globally rare habitats that marine animals rely on. These areas are often characterized by the presence of endemic species and are usually teeming with life. Unfortunately, the qualities that make these places unique also make them incredibly Read more about Getting to the bottom of the oceans’ tallest peaks[…]

National Geographic Profiles Seamounts

Marine Conservation Institute collaborated with partner photographer Brian Skerry to help create the cover story of the February issue of National Geographic Magazine: Saving Our Oceans. The article highlights some of the ocean’s most pristine places — like Cortes Bank seamount off the coast of California — and is brought to life with stunning photos taken by Brian Skerry Read more about National Geographic Profiles Seamounts[…]